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Is It OK To Say "OK, Boomer?"
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Is It OK To Say "OK, Boomer?"

Two weeks ago, The New York Times published a piece that has had far-ranging effects and stoked inter-generational ire just by focusing on what could be viewed as an innocuous phrase: “OK, boomer.” The article explains the rising popularity of responding to older people’s opinions by saying “OK, boomer,” referring to their belonging to the Baby Boomer generation. The phrase began among Zoomers and is meant to encapsulate the angst of Gen Z when it comes to the world they’ve inherited—and there may be some legitimacy. Millennials were the first generation worse off than the generation before them. To quote the article:

A lot of [Baby Boomers] don’t believe in climate change or don’t believe people can get jobs with dyed hair, and a lot of them are stubborn in that view. Teenagers just respond, ‘Ok, boomer.’ It’s like, we’ll prove you wrong, we’re still going to be successful because the world is changing.

 

The phrase has gained so much attention that one entrepreneurial Zoomer put a design of the words on clothing and sold more than $10,000 worth of merchandise.

Following the article, “OK, boomer” seems to have captured the cultural moment. A 25 year-old politician in New Zealand used it to silence older hecklers, The Times’ own opinion column weighed in on it, and the Internet is still abuzz with the echo of “OK, boomer” fallout weeks after the article was published.

But is it OK to say “OK, boomer?” Detractors say that at best it’s stereotypical, at worst it’s ageism. Baby Boomer proponents say that it’s a flippant phrase and shouldn’t be given more weight than it deserves.

Where do you fall in the debate? Is it OK for teens and young adults to say “OK, boomer” or are they crossing a line? Let us know in the comments.

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Comments (17)
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Discrimination in any form is poisonous. We live in an environment of ageism. Those who would bridle at being addressed on the basis of their gender, weight or skin color feel that calling older people"hun" or"young man" is OK. Persons need to be taken for who they are and what they can do.

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No, it is wrong. If we are living in a PC culture, this is unacceptable ageism.

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The actual problem is that nobody else seems to know that this phrase isnt inherently an insult(or at least not a new insult). Anybody familiar with classic situation of person from an older generation being unfamiliar with what the newer generation is doing and being met with "whatever old man!" It's just that, it's nothing new. There will more than likely always be specific generation gap where there is a lack of understanding between the 2 sides.

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Growing up , I would never and not even think to say anything that would show DISRESPECTFUL to my Parents. (PERIOD.)

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We are Boomers. All of us created the first cell phone the youngins did not, and the always talk on them , get in accidents when talking on the./ In my thought I think it is ok to just to say Boomer, not okBoomer" And, yes in PC World it is not correct, however in this society of ours now we as Boomers can say that to ourselves not to each other. As most of us were raised with manner, good etiquette, etc.. I could go on yet I will stop and just say Not ok thank you Susan

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