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Concord
Concord
Massachusetts
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Member of the World Health Organization Global Network of Age Friendly Cities and Communities

Claimed city

Concord is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, in the United States. At the 2010 census, the town population was 17,668. A division of the municipal government of Concord, the Council on Aging provides services to Concord's seniors. If you live in Concord, and you are 60 years old or older, you are automatically eligible for all COA programs and services. Services include:

  1. Caregiver Support: Caregivers' Support Group is for those caring for loved ones with Alzheimer's or related dementia. 
  2. Transportation: The Council on Aging (COA) can provide transportation on a first come, first served basis to Concord seniors around town for medical appointments, trips to the bank, haircuts, visits to a friend, events at the Council on Aging, and more.
  3. Ask a Lawyer: Six months out of the year, an attorney specializing in elder law volunteers at the COA on the last Thursday of the month six times each year.
Contacts22 Monument Square
Concord, MA 01742
978-318-3100
[email protected]
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Managed by the Age Friendly Foundation

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star
Everyone here is kind and welcoming.
star
2 town centers that have sidewalks and many local shops. One downside is that this is a more expensive area to live. But very pretty & nice and a strong arts community.
star
I believe that Concord is very age friendly. The town is very accessible by bike and on foot. The Emerson Umbrella has a vibrant arts scene and lots of courses throughout the year. Parking can be an issue at times. New restaurants continue to pop up which is nice. When we first moved to Concord almost 20 years ago, the 99 was the only gig in town for a meal. The new Bruce Freeman Rail Trail is opening soon which will be a tremendous new asset to the town. The Concord Free Library offers loads of speaking engagements by visiting authors.
star
There is practically no "affordable housing" for seniors in my area (and I only ended up in the "millionaire" town of Concord after being a caregiver for my grandfather and then my mother (both of whom passed away) and I had to find an apartment very quickly, and I had just been laid off from my job, so I was broke. Also, three years ago, I had a bad fall (because of nastiness of overnight tech support in my apt. complex to help me out with a fire detector alarm), had to have surgery, and (because I'm no-one important, famous, wealthy, etc.), I'm still going through rehab and trying to be able to walk normally again and get back to work (and last orthopedic surgeon to whom I was referred last Thursday 'put me down' in such a terrible way that it will take me a while to even start looking for a helpful doctor again). In the meantime, I'm living in a very old, tiny, Section 8 apartment -- with uncaring landlords and awful upstairs tenants -- which is just adding to my stress. I can't even move, even if I found better housing, because my leg and back hurt too badly (it's painful for me to shovel snow off my car, take trash out, or vacuum my tiny apt.). There's a new outreach person at the local COA, so I'm hoping she can help me..... There is no ramp to get into my apt., so even when I was using a wheelchair, I had to have help getting in and out. And all the small, less expensive places to live here are all becoming MacMansions and rents are skyrocketing. Plus, the only way I can now get into Boston or environs (for job interviews, etc.) is via train (I used to be able to drive into Cambridge, take the subway/T and walk 7-8 blocks to get to a job or interview).
star
There is practically no "affordable housing" for seniors in my area (and I only ended up in the "millionaire" town of Concord after being a caregiver for my grandfather and then my mother (both of whom passed away) and I had to find an apartment very quickly, and I had just been laid off from my job, so I was broke. Also, three years ago, I had a bad fall (because of nastiness of overnight tech support in my apt. complex to help me out with a fire detector alarm), had to have surgery, and (because I'm no-one important, famous, wealthy, etc.), I'm still going through rehab and trying to be able to walk normally again and get back to work (and last orthopedic surgeon to whom I was referred last Thursday 'put me down' in such a terrible way that it will take me a while to even start looking for a helpful doctor again). In the meantime, I'm living in a very old, tiny, Section 8 apartment -- with uncaring landlords and awful upstairs tenants -- which is just adding to my stress. I can't even move, even if I found better housing, because my leg and back hurt too badly (it's painful for me to shovel snow off my car, take trash out, or vacuum my tiny apt.). There's a new outreach person at the local COA, so I'm hoping she can help me..... There is no ramp to get into my apt., so even when I was using a wheelchair, I had to have help getting in and out. And all the small, less expensive places to live here are all becoming MacMansions and rents are skyrocketing. Plus, the only way I can now get into Boston or environs (for job interviews, etc.) is via train (I used to be able to drive into Cambridge, take the subway/T and walk 7-8 blocks to get to a job or interview).

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Taxes

C

How did Massachusetts earn the grade of C? We examined the state taxes based on how age friendly they are. Massachusetts has a state sales tax of 6.25%. Of particular interest is that Massachusetts does not have taxes on social security. There are estate taxes. There are no taxes imposed on inheritance. Massachusetts has an effective property tax rate of 1.21%. Weighing these taxes and other taxes most likely to impact the aging population is how Massachusetts earned its state tax grade of C.

Learn more about taxes in Massachusetts

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